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Life

A Very Urban Sukkot

October 2, 2015, by

Sukkos – for many, it’s summer’s last hurrah. Being outdoors, hopefully in green, lush and warm (or not too cold) surroundings. A pleasant return to nature before autumn really kicks in. A great time to spend away from home, perhaps in a rural environment. (Imagine spending Sukkos at a sleepaway camp or a bungalow colony…)

Sukkot Meals Pure and Simple

August 20, 2015, by

“What do you do in the sukkah?” I once heard an interviewer ask a man as the holiday of Sukkot approached. His reply? “You eat, and you eat and then–you eat again!” How true. During the week of Sukkot, we consider our sukkah to be our home for seven days. Since the primary activities of

Sukkot: The Lulav

October 1, 2009, by

At Sukkot we fulfill the mitzva of taking the four species – etrog (citron), lulav (palm), hadas (myrtle) and arava (willow). While we must take all four kinds to fulfill the mitzva, we refer specifically to the mitzva of “lulav”. The lulav is also the central species and the longest, and the bracha refers only

Sukkot: A Sukkah Life

September 30, 2009, by

For most, it remains an enigma. We say it; it seems like it fits – but one suspects that we are essentially clueless (an admitted projection) to its Sukkos significance. I refer to the strange recitation at the end of our bentsching, (grace after meals) where we customarily insert a special request throughout Sukkos: Harachaman

The Year of the Flying Sukkah

October 6, 2008, by

This story took place close to a decade ago. Although it’s about a flying Sukkah, it really began about a week before the holiday, when the stores throughout Jerusalem were selling a new type of Schach that could be used over and over again. Their advertisement ditty, “U’b’Sukkaseinu…” played to a catch tune, blared throughout

Celebrating Sukkot With Culinary Stars’ Favorites

October 6, 2008, by

Starry, starry nights, eating meals in the Sukkah with its leafy roof partly open to the star-studded sky, and enjoying a variety of vegetables and fruits from the final fall harvest is always a memorable and spiritual experience. The Sukkah symbolizes the temporary shelters in which our ancestors lived during their 40 years in the

Sukkos: A Sukkah Life

September 30, 2008, by

We say it; it seems like it fits – but one suspects that we are essentially clueless (an admitted projection) to its Sukkos significance. I refer to the strange recitation at the very end of the grace after meals, where we customarily insert a special request throughout Sukkos: Harachaman hu yakim lanu es sukkas David

A Jumble of Holidays

September 10, 2008, by

There’s an old joke in the Jewish community: The High Holidays are always either early or late; they’re never on time! Well, this year they’re late (Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on September 29th). But aside from that, this year Shabbat begins one day after Yom Kippur ends (the evening on October 10th). Sukkot, of

Tzav: Tefillin on Chol HaMoed

March 30, 2007, by

In many communities, especially in Israel, the custom is not to put tefillin on during chol hamoed – the intermediate days of the holidays. The reason we don’t put on tefillin on the holidays themselves, as well as on Shabbat, is that the tefillin are referred to in the Torah as an OT – a

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