Best Chometz-Substitute List

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28 Mar 2012
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Please note: Eileen Goltz is a freelance kosher food writer. The Orthodox Union makes no endorsements or representations regarding kashrut certification of various products/vendors referred to in her articles, blog or web site.

At some point during Pesach preparations we’ve all tried to convert a mainstream recipe into a Pesach one…only to discover that we don’t have a clue as to what to substitute for a chometz ingredient. This panic moment is why I started compiling my “Complete List of Pesach Substitutes.” I’ve added some great new substitutions this year. If anyone has any other substitutions that they would like to share, please do at eztlog@gmail.com or at my blog cuisinebyeileen.wordpress.com.

Basic Substitutions:


Soy Sauce Substitute

Yields 2/3 cup

This soy sauce substitute doesn’t taste exactly like the real thing, but it makes a flavorful alternative for Pesach stir fry.

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Combine all the ingredients.
  2. At this point, you can either a) use the sauce as is, leaving for an hour to give the flavors a chance to blend, or b) for a thicker, richer sauce, boil the liquid until it is reduced by half, about 3 Tablespoons. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator.

Use the sauce within 3 to 4 days.


Cashew Sour Cream

Yields 1 cup

It’s creamy and you can use it in any recipe that calls for sour cream. It refrigerates well.

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Cover cashews with water and soak for a few hours, or overnight.
  2. Pour off all water, and place nuts in food processor.
  3. Add ¼ cup cold water, salt, vinegar and lemon juice. Puree for 3-4 minutes or until completely smooth and creamy in consistency.

Use in any recipe that calls for sour cream. Refrigerate in an airtight container for up to a week.


Corn Syrup Substitute

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Combine all ingredients in a heavy, large pan. Stir and bring to a boil.
  2. Reduce heat to a simmer and put cover on it for 3 minutes to get sugar crystals off the sides of the pan.
  3. Uncover and cook until it reaches soft ball stage. Stir often.
  4. Cool syrup and store in a covered container at room temperature.

Eileen Goltz is a freelance kosher food writer who was born and raised in the Chicago area. She graduated from Indiana University and the Cordon Bleu Cooking School in Paris. She lectures on various food-related topics across the U.S. and Canada and writes weekly columns for the Chicago Jewish News, kosher.com and the OU Shabbat Shalom Website. She is the author of the Perfectly Pareve Cookbook (Feldheim) and is a contributing writer for the Chicken Soup for the Soul Book Group, Chicago Sun Times, Detroit Free Press and Woman’s World Magazine. You can visit Eileen’s blog by clicking: Cuisine by Eileen.

The words of this author reflect his/her own opinions and do not necessarily represent the official position of the Orthodox Union.