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Sarah Rudolph

Sarah C. Rudolph is a Jewish educator and freelance writer. She has been sharing her passion for Jewish texts of all kinds for over 15 years, with students of all ages. Sarah's essays have been published in a variety of internet and print media, including Times of Israel, Kveller, Jewish Action, The Lehrhaus, TorahMusings, and more. Sarah lives in Cleveland with her husband and four children, but is privileged to learn online with students all over the world through www.TorahTutors.org and www.WebYeshiva.org She is also Editor-At-Large at Deracheha: womenandmitzvot.org.

Pathways of Sefer Vayikra

May 8, 2018, by

Like many people, I think, I long had this idea that much of the book of Vayikra is boring. I mean, of course, none of G-d’s words could possibly be boring – but yeah, boring. Complicated, dry and, without the Beit Hamikdash, largely (though of course not wholly) irrelevant. Also gross, for those of us

What Do We Value in Jewish Education for Women?

May 2, 2018, by

With the OU Department of Women’s Initiatives challenge grant applications due this week, I’ve been thinking a lot about questions of women’s Torah study. What do we value in Jewish education for women, and what are we willing and able to do to realize our values? As a woman, a learner, a teacher, a mother,

Inconceivable!

April 25, 2018, by

Vizzini: Inconceivable! Inigo Montoya: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means. In my naïve youth, it took me years of knowing The Princess Bride by heart to understand what Inigo meant here: he figured Vizzini must think “inconceivable” was a curse word, since he kept invoking

Hashem is Where?

April 18, 2018, by

I was recently talking with my oldest about the pride I felt when she started school at two years old and her teachers commended her knowledge, and conscientious recitation, of berachot. It was an easy thing to teach her; she saw me saying berachot when I ate, and at that age she longed to do

Bat Mitzvah Musings

April 9, 2018, by

I just had the immense and surreal pleasure of celebrating my first baby becoming a bat mitzvah. At some point in the course of all the preparations, it occurred to me to ask my rabbi about the bracha of baruch shep’tarani mei’onsho shel zeh. I knew this bracha is recited by the father of a

A Woman’s Place, In and Out of the Tent

March 19, 2018, by

I happened to notice that last week, the 26th of Adar, was the yahrzeit of Sarah Schenirer, the founder of Bais Yaakov. I didn’t go to Bais Yaakov, but my mother did, and if the light in her eyes when she told stories about her school and principal weren’t enough to instill me with an appreciation for

Pesach: Freedom from Stuff

March 7, 2018, by

I love this time of year – in particular, the month leading up to Pesach. It’s not that I don’t get stressed over preparations for the approaching holiday, because I do. I even get stressed over the articles that pop up telling us how not to be stressed. “Don’t worry; you don’t have to scrub

Esther, Margaret and the Weasels: A Lesson in Creativity

February 28, 2018, by

When a friend recently described me as creative, I was flattered but not at all sure she was right. True, I manage the occasional bit of amateur artwork with my kids’ fruits and vegetables. My crowning achievement: a stegosaurus made out of a cantaloupe for my son’s fifth birthday party. (He’s almost ten and I’m

Vashti’s Pimples

February 14, 2018, by

Mishenichnas Adar, when Adar begins, we increase many things. Rejoicing, for sure. And practical preparations for Purim, naturally: we’re choosing costumes and mishloach manot themes (or non-themes; no judgment here!), we’re planning our seudot, and we’re scheduling our Megilah readings. And of course, we’re teaching our children the story of Purim. Too often, we’re teaching