HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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288. Food That Do Not Require Brachos Mid-Meal
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43:1 Anything eaten during a meal of foods that one normally eats during the course of a meal in order to sate his hunger, like meat, fish, side dishes, etc., does not require a separate bracha, neither before nor after. Since they are eaten in order to satisfy hunger, they are considered part of the […]
287. Interrupting a Meal for Various Reasons
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42:22 If someone stops to daven during the course of a meal, he does not repeat hamotzi when resuming the meal. Similarly, if someone takes a nap – even a long one – during a meal, or has to interrupt for other reasons, including to use the bathroom, he may resume where he left off. […]
286. More About Leaving Mid-Meal
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42:20 If a group of people eat together and some of them leave with the intention of returning, as long as at least one person remains in the original place, the original gathering is not considered as having been disbanded. When the others return, they are considered to be returning to the original gathering without […]
285. Leaving During a Meal
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42:18 When visiting at someone’s home, one should not ask for food until offered by his hosts. One may not eat from a meal that is not sufficient for his hosts. If someone does this, even if invited by the host, he is compared to a thief. This is actually considered a serious transgression. 42:19 […]
284. Feeding Your Host’s Children
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42:16 A married woman should not drink intoxicating beverages when her husband is not around, or while traveling even if he’s there. If she normally drinks wine when her husband is there, she may have a moderate amount in his absence. (This is derived by the Talmud in a discussion of things learned from the […]
283. Feeding the Waiter
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42:14 If someone is eating food that was served to him and the aroma is appetizing, he should give a small piece to the one who brought it to him, since seeing food and desiring it but being unable to taste it isn’t good for a person. (This applied in times and places where household […]
282. Staring at People
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42:12 When drinking water, it is not proper to do so facing others; one should turn his face to the side. (Mishnah Brurah 170:13 cites an opinion limiting this to drinking outside of a meal. He considers it unseemly behavior for a scholar.) 42:13 We shouldn’t look directly at others who are eating or drinking, […]
281. Disposing of Bread
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42:10 We may use bread or any other kind of food for medicinal purposes even though it may be ruined through this use. (The Mishnah Brurah extends this to anything that one needs to do that is typically accomplished using some food item, for example, anointing with oil – MB 171:4.) 42:11 One should not […]
280. Inappropriate Use of Food
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42:8 A person may use a loaf of bread for any purpose that does not ruin it. Therefore, a loaf of bread must not be used, for example, as a trivet to support a pot of food. If one uses bread as a utensil to scoop up a stew, he must be sure to eat […]
279. Etiquette
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42:6 If two people or more eat at the same table, even if each has his own plate, it is appropriate to wait for the person of the highest stature to start eating first. One who starts eating before the person of higher stature is considered a glutton. 42:7 If two people are eating from […]