HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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1,371. More About Not Mourning on Yom Tov
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219:7 Even though shiva is not observed on yom tov or chol hamoed, the rules of shloshim do not take effect on these days and the mourner may wear freshly-laundered clothes. Since one may not shave over the course of a holiday anyway, it counts towards the thirty days of shloshim, so he counts thirty […]
1,370. Mourning Doesn’t Commence on Yom Tov
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219:5 If a person buried a relative or received timely notification of a relative’s passing on a festival, whether on yom tov or during chol hamoed, he does not start mourning until after the holiday. Things that are done in private are observed as per usual. He doesn’t change his clothes because this would be […]
1,369. A Baal Korei in Mourning
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219:3 If the person who is paid by a shul to read the Torah becomes a mourner, he should not go to that shul on the Shabbos of shiva. This is because, if he is there, it is doubtful whether or not he should read the Torah 219:4 Shabbos counts towards the seven days of […]
1,368. The Shabbos of Shiva
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219:1 On Shabbos during the week of shiva, the mourner observes the private aspects of mourning, i.e., he may not engage in marital relations or wash. Public forms of mourning, however, are not observed. Therefore, before reciting Mizmor Shir l’Yom HaShabbos on Friday evening, the mourner puts on regular shoes, sits on a normal chair, […]
1,367. Being Notified of a Death
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218:1 A person observes mourning even when informed of a relative’s passing by: a lone witness; a witness who heard from another witness; a non-Jew speaking without realizing the impact of his statement. 218:2 If a person receives a letter informing him of the death of a relative and it does not specify whether the […]
1,366. A Minor Who Loses a Relative
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217:2 If a child loses a close relative, even if he reaches the age of majority during the week of shiva, he is exempt from all the requirements of mourning since he was exempt at the time of the relative’s passing. He should, however, observe the mourning practices of the twelve months for a parent, […]
1,365. One Who Neglected to Sit Shiva
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216:3 When it comes to the twelve months of mourning for a parent, we don’t say that part of the day is like the whole day. Just the opposite, the practice is to add the  day of yahrzeit and to observe all the restrictions of the twelve months on that day, even if it falls […]
1,364. Part of the Day
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216:1 On the final day of shiva, after the visitors depart from the mourner, all the things that were prohibited during the shiva become permitted. This is because the Talmud tells us that a part of the day is considered like the whole day. This rule excludes marital relations, which are prohibited  the entire day, […]
1,363. Those Who Refuse to Mourn
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215:2 The Sages said that when one member of a family dies, the entire family should tremble. A metaphor for the situation is a pile of stones: when one of the stones is dislodged, they all shift. G-d’s attribute of justice is focused on them until it dissipates. The entire week of shiva, the sword […]
1,362. Excessive Mourning
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214:3 If the mourner’s son needs to be circumcised, the mourner may go to the shul even during the first three days of shiva (when the mourning is most intense). If the mourner is the sandek (the one who holds the baby during the bris) or the mohel, he may not go out during the […]