No Results Found.

Embarrassing Others
by in
It should go without saying that embarrassing or insulting another person is a serious transgression of the Torah. The Talmud even equates embarrassing another person with murder.[1] We are taught that one should sooner have oneself killed rather than embarrass another person.[2] This idea is derived from Tamar who was ready to have herself killed […]
Lending Money
by in
Not only is giving money for worthy causes a mitzva but even lending money for such causes is equally a mitzva as well.[1] In fact, some authorities insinuate that lending money is even greater than giving it away.[2] The Torah looks very unfavorably upon those who refuse to lend money.[3] Even lending out household objects […]
Ba’al Tashchit – Wasting
by in
Although the Torah only mentions a prohibition against “wasting” and “destroying” in the context of cutting down fruit trees,[1] it is nevertheless forbidden to waste or needlessly destroy any item whatsoever.[2] As the Sefer Hachinuch writes: “It is the way of the pious and those of good deeds that they have peace and rejoice in […]
Baal Talin – Paying Employees On Time
by in
The obligation to pay one’s employees in a timely manner is a mitzva of utmost importance. In fact, one who fails to do so transgresses multiple prohibitions of the Torah.[1] Failure to pay one’s employees on time is a transgression referred to as “baal talin”, the prohibition of withholding salary. The mitzva of paying one’s […]
The Author of the Haggada
by in
The source and authorship of the Pesach hagadda is a subject which is both intriguing and mysterious, with no clear answers. In fact, it is a book which has evolved from its original form over time, and continues to do so. Indeed, one will readily notice that there are a multitude of different editions of […]
Keeping Secrets
by in
It goes without saying that according to halacha it is strictly forbidden to reveal the secrets of others. In fact, in addition to the basic prohibition against lying which one transgresses when breaking a promise not to reveal a secret, doing so is also a violation of the Torah’s prohibition of “smiting one’s neighbor in […]
Inflicting Pain for Fun
by in
There are a number of recreational sports which require one to punch, beat, or otherwise inflict pain on another person. Such activities include judo, boxing, fencing, tackle football and other similar contact activities. While such activities may appear to be harmless pastimes, engaging in these activities may actually be a prohibition of the Torah. Even […]
Giving Credit Where Credit is Due
by in
A fundamental Torah principle relating to intellectual honesty is to always give credit where credit is due. For example, when repeating something that one has heard from someone else, one should be sure to quote it in that person’s name. In the event that there was also another person responsible for conveying the information, then […]
Responding to Letters
by in
It’s fair to say that most people, including this writer, are greatly disturbed by those who don’t respond to letters, emails, or return phone calls within a reasonable amount of time. In fact, in the event of a first time correspondence, the timeliness in which a person responds is actually the only gesture which offers […]
Reuniting with Friends
by in
The Talmud teaches that one who has not seen a good friend in over a month should recite a special blessing – the shehecheyanu blessing- upon seeing them again.[1] A “friend” in this context refers to a person with whom one is exceptionally close, and whose presence brings one great happiness.[2] In the event that […]