Yevamos 15:6-7

Yevamos 15:6

If a woman returned from overseas and reported that her husband died there, she is able to re-marry and to receive the value of her kesubah but her co-wife may not (because, as we said in mishna 15:4, one wife is not believed when she testifies about a co-wife because their rivalry provides motivation to lie). If the co-wife was the daughter of a Yisroel married to a kohein, Rabbi Tarfon says she may continue to eat terumah (based on the assumption that her husband is still alive). Rabbi Akiva says that this path leads to sin (i.e., eating terumah impermissibly). Rather, she may not re-marry (in case her husband is still alive) but she may also not eat terumah (in case he is dead).

Yevamos 15:7

If a woman says, “My husband died and then my father-in-law died” she may re-marry and receive the value of her kesubah but her mother-in-law may not (because a mother-in-law and daughter-in-law are not believed about one another as per mishna 15:4). If the mother-in-law was the daughter of a Yisroel married to a kohein, Rabbi Tarfon says she may continue to eat terumah but Rabbi Akiva says that this path leads to sin so the mother-in-law may neither marry nor eat terumah. If a man betrothed one of five women but he doesn’t know which one and each one claims that it was her, Rabbi Tarfon says he must give each one of them a get, then he places the value of a single kesubah among them and leaves. Rabbi Akiva says that this path leads him to sin (in certain cases – see Talmud Yevamos 118b for details), so he must give each one a get and pay each one the value of the kesubah. If someone robbed one of five people but he doesn’t know which one and each one claims that it was him, Rabbi Tarfon says he places the stolen object among them and leaves. Rabbi Akiva says that this path leads him to sin so he must repay each one the value of the theft.
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