Pesachim 6:5-6

Pesachim 6:5

If a person slaughtered his Passover offering on Shabbos under the wrong name, he would have to bring a sin offering (for violating Shabbos). If any other sacrifice was slaughtered on Shabbos under the name of the Passover offering, if it is an animal that could not be used for the Passover offering (for example, a cow), he must bring a sin offering. If the animal could have been used for a Passover offering, Rabbi Eliezer says he must bring a sin offering and Rabbi Yehoshua says he is not so obligated. Rabbi Eliezer said, “A Passover offering – which is permitted to offer on Shabbos under the proper name– obligates one to bring a sin offering if brought under the wrong name. Doesn’t it go without saying that other sacrifices – which are prohibited altogether on Shabbos – should obligate one in a sin offering if offered under the wrong name?” Rabbi Yehoshua replied, “No. If you say that his actions rendered his Passover offering prohibited, does it follow that they turned his prohibited sacrifice permitted?” (That is, he disqualified a permitted sacrifice by calling it by the wrong name; he effected no such change by misnaming other sacrifices.) Rabbi Eliezer sought to bolster his position by citing the case of the public offerings. These are permitted to be brought on Shabbos under the proper name and one who slaughters something else under their name must bring a sin offering. Rabbi Yehoshua replied that the cases are not similar: the public offerings had a specified limit of animals that could be brought – no more – while the Passover offering had no such limit. Rabbi Meir was of the opinion that even one who slaughtered another sacrifice under the name of the public offerings was exempt.

Pesachim 6:6

If one slaughtered his Passover offering on Shabbos for people who are physically incapable of eating it, for people who did not join his group in advance, for uncircumcised males or for ritually-unclean people, he must bring a sin offering. If he slaughtered it on Shabbos for both people who can eat it and for people who are physically incapable of eating it, for both people who joined his group in advance and for people who did not, for both circumcised and uncircumcised males, or for ritually-clean and ritually-unclean people, he is not obligated in a sin offering. If he slaughtered it on Shabbos and it was discovered to be blemished, he must bring a sin offering; if it were found to have a disqualifying internal injury, he is not so obligated. If he slaughtered it on Shabbos and it was discovered that the owners had left their group, died or been rendered ritually-impure, he is not obligated in a sin offering because he had permission to slaughter it when he performed the act.
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