No Results Found.

Rabbi Weinreb’s Parsha Column, Mishpatim
by in
I was never very good at math. It all goes back to the fourth grade. I came down with a case of some ordinary childhood disease, probably chicken pox, at just the time that Mrs. Levine was teaching the class about the concept of percentages. I must've missed about a week of school, and when I returned to class, it seemed as if everyone was speaking Greek. Phrases like "50%" and "75%" and "a half" and "three-quarters" cut the air, and I simply did not know what these strange words meant. Mrs. Levine probably tried to catch me up with the rest of the class, but all I remember are feelings of frustration.
The Slow End of Slavery
by in
In parshat Mishpatim we witness one of the great stylistic features of the Torah, its transition from narrative to law. Until now the book of Exodus has been primarily narrative: the story of the enslavement of the Israelites and their journey to freedom. Now comes detailed legislation, the “constitution of liberty.” This is not accidental […]
Parshat Mishpatim: Causing Harm
by in
“If he gets up and goes outside under his own power, the one who struck him is absolved. He shall only pay for his lost time and he shall provide for his healing.” (Shemot 21:19) Parshat Mishpatim outlines many of the laws regulating liability for causing harm to a person or his property. If a […]
Parshat Mishpatim: What is Stealing?
by in
“If the stolen article is found in his possession whether a bull, a donkey, or a lamb [and it is] alive, he shall pay twofold.” (Shemot 22:3) Everyone acknowledges that it is wrong to steal. However, what is stealing? Where should the line be drawn between borrowing and stealing? If a person takes something from […]
Reconciling the Written and Oral Laws
by in
And Hashem said to Moshe: Ascend the mountain to Me and be there. And I will give you the stone Tablets and the torah and mitzvah that I have written for you to teach to them. (Sefer Shemot 24:12) 1. The Torah is comprised of a Written and Oral Law Parshat Mishpatim continues the enumeration […]