Sign up to receive the OU's popular Shnayim Mikra series via email. Shnayim Mikra provides a verse-by-verse review of the parsha in seven weekly installments, corresponding to the seven aliyos. Insights and commentary are provided by master educators familiar from the OU's Nach Yomi, including Rabbi Dr. Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, Rabbi Menachen Leibtag, Rabbi Yitzchak Etshalom, Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein, and others. The daily emails will feature a text synopsis of each aliyah by Rabbi Jack Abramowitz, author of The Shnayim Mikra Companion. From the email, subscribers can click to access the accompanying audio lecture, plus the text of the parsha in Hebrew and English.

Shnayim Mikra provides a verse-by-verse review of the parsha in seven weekly installments, corresponding to the seven aliyos. Insights and commentary are provided by master educators familiar from the OU's Nach Yomi, including Rabbi Dr. Tzvi Hersh Weinreb, Rabbi Menachen Leibtag, Rabbi Yitzchak Etshalom, Rabbi Dr. Gidon Rothstein, and others.

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Nitzavim – Sheini
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God has made the Jews His nation, just as He promised their forefathers He would. But the covenant God is forging isn’t just with the Jews present at Moshe’s speech! It includes future generations as well!
Nitzavim – Rishon
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And now, everyone in the nation is assembled before God, from the leaders of the nation to the laborers: men, women and children! Why? To enter into the covenant with God, with all that entails.
Ki Tavo- Haftarah
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Several years ago, I gave a speech in an Orthodox synagogue (whom I would have expected to be most likely to take Scriptural promises seriously) in which I asked my listeners to imagine a time when Jerusalem would be so central to the world’s economy that non-Jews would volunteer gifts to the city. To accommodate […]
Ki Tavo – Sh’vi’i
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Moshe gathered the nation to deliver his final speech. He told them that they personally saw what God did to Pharaoh and the Egyptians, but they didn’t fully get it. Now they’ve spent forty years in the wilderness with miraculous sources of food and clothes so that they could get to know God better. They […]
Ki Tavo – Shishi
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If enemies attack, God will quickly put them to flight. They’ll come as a unified force, but flee in all directions. The grain will be blessed, as will all the Jews’ endeavors. They’ll be secure in their land. The world will recognize Israel as God’s nation and defer to them. God will grant them all […]
Ki Tavo – Chamishi
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As we mentioned at the beginning of parshas Re’eh, when the Jews entered the land, they were to deliver blessings and curses on Mount Grizim and Mount Eival, respectively. Six Tribes were assigned to each mountain. (For this purpose, Levi was counted as one of the 12, while Ephraim and Menashe were considered a single […]
Ki Tavo – R’vi’i
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Moshe and the elders commanded the Jews to erect twelve huge stones after they cross the Jordan River into the land of Israel. They were to plaster these stones and write the words of the Torah on them. (There is a difference of opinion as to what part or parts specifically were to be written. […]
Ki Tavo – Shlishi
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Moshe ends his second discourse by urging the people to keep the laws that God has given them. They made a commitment to God to do so and He has promised that if they do, He will elevate them above other nations. If the Jews keep their end of the bargain, they will be a […]
Ki Tavo – Sheini
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In the third and sixth years of the Sabbatical cycle, one would bring the special tithe for the poor in addition to the regular tithe for the Leviim. Tithes would have to be removed before Passover of the fourth and seventh years. On the final day of Passover, the owner would make a declaration that […]
Ki Tavo – Rishon
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After the Jews settle the land, the first fruits of their crops are to be placed in a basket and brought to the Temple. The kohein takes the basket, waves it and places it before the altar. The owner then recites the following declaration: “My ancestor (Yaakov) was a wanderer from Aram (or he was […]