Rabbi Weinreb's weekly email includes a personal message as well as his Parsha column.

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Toldot: Different Forms of Power
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The professor was wrong. But in his field of expertise he was always right. His name was Dr. Dennis Wrong, and his surname made him the object of much teasing, at least during his childhood. He was a prominent sociologist, and I took a course from him while still in graduate school. The course was […]
Vayerah: Quiet Strength
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The election season is finally over. Whether we are disappointed with the results or gladdened by them, we unanimously breathe a sigh of relief that the campaign has concluded. We are especially appreciative of the fact that we no longer have to hear grandiose promises expressed by each candidate, promises that we all know will […]
Lech Lecha: Solidarity or Separation?
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What is a family to do when one member abandons its norms and traditions? This problem has confounded families since the beginning of time. How does a family handle its prodigal son, or sons? Curiously, the term “prodigal son” is associated in the popular consciousness with a wayward son who is welcomed back into the […]
Noach: Connecting the Dots
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Only a few of the games that I played during my childhood are still popular today. One of them is “connect the dots.” Nowadays, it comes in some very sophisticated and complex versions. But I remember it from the days in which we were given coloring books and instructed to connect several dozen numbered dots […]
Bereshit: “Ignorance is Bliss?”
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“Ignorance is bliss.” There was a time not too long ago when the mention of these three simple words in the midst of a friendly conversation would have engendered a long and interesting discussion, perhaps even a debate. There would have been speculation about the origin of the statement. Who was it that said “ignorance […]
Ha’azinu: Repression of the Sublime
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It was advertised as one symposium at a major psychology conference. It was to be a discussion about memory and forgetfulness. But it turned out to be one of the most intense and instructive days that I have ever witnessed. The first speaker began by insisting that the fact that we remember things is obvious. […]
Vayeilech: The Hidden Face and the Silent Song
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Too many times in the history of our people, we have been compelled to ask the question, “Where is God?” Too many of our prophets, beginning with Moses himself, have been confounded by the question, “Why do the righteous suffer?” Philosophers have so struggled to reconcile the concept of a benevolent deity with the evil […]
Ki Tavo: To Each His Language
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There was a time when the literary treasures of the Jewish people were accessible only to those with a reading knowledge of Hebrew. This is no longer the case. I know of no major Jewish religious work which has not been translated into English in recent years and, in most instances, into many other languages […]
Ki Teitzei: The Rich Fruits of Forgiveness
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The spirit of forgiveness is in the air. Since the beginning of this month, the month of Elul, Sephardic communities have been reciting selichot, prayers petitioning the Almighty for his forgiveness. They have been doing so each and every day, rising before dawn in order to get to the synagogue on time. Ashkenazic communities, following […]
Shoftim: Tree-like
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I love metaphors. An apt metaphor can help stimulate boundless creativity and can lead to a deeper and richer understanding of the concept being studied. Take, for example, the metaphor of a tree as representing a human being. We find this metaphor in this week’s Torah portion, Shoftim, in the following verse: “When you besiege […]