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1,170. Non-Jews, Kohanim, Leviim
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177:12 If a Jew buys an animal from a non-Jew and it’s not known whether or not this animal has previously given birth, and it subsequently gives birth in the Jew’s possession, the offspring is a doubtful first-born. Even if the non-Jew says – without understanding the ramifications of his statement – that the animal […]
1,169. Permitting a First-Born Animal
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177:10 A first-born animal only becomes permitted by developing a blemish. It is prohibited to lock it up so that it will die on its own. Doing so would be considered causing the loss of a sanctified item. 177:11 It is prohibited to cause a blemish in a first-born animal, even indirectly, such as by […]
1,168. Not Benefitting From a First-Born Animal
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177:8 If the first-born animal was slaughtered and found to be non-kosher, it is forbidden to have benefit from its hide and meat; the animal must be buried. This is also the rule if the animal died before it could be slaughtered. The practice is to wrap the animal in a sheet and to bury […]
1,167. Treating the Mitzvah Respectfully
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177:6 The kohein must raise the first-born animal until it develops a blemish. He may sell it to another Israelite (non-kohein) whether or not it has a blemish. The Israelites must treat it as a sanctified first-born animal and not buy and sell it for profit. 177:7 We may not skin a first-born animal so […]
1,166. When the Animal Develops a Blemish
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177:4 Nowadays, the first-born animal must be kept until it develops a blemish. Once this happens, it is shown to three Torah scholars, one of whom must be expert in identifying whether a blemish is permanent. If it is, they permit it. After this, the animal may be slaughtered and, if it proves kosher, eaten. […]
1,165. Giving the Animal to a Kohein
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177:2 If, while the owner is raising the animal, the kohein said, “Give it to me and I’ll take care of it,” the following rules apply. If the animal is unblemished, the owner is not permitted to give it to him because it will appear that the kohein is doing him a favor, in exchange […]
1,164. First-Born Animals
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176:8 Covered wagons, coaches and other vehicles for transporting people sometimes have wool linings that are shaatnez because they were likely sewn with linen threads. It is permitted to travel in such vehicles but one must be careful not to lean on the sides where there is shaatnez. One must certainly be careful not to […]
1,163. Shaatnez in Your Lap or on Your Back
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176:6 If a Jew is sewing shaatnez garments for a non-Jew, he may do so in the normal fashion, even though the garments rest in his lap, so long as he doesn’t intend to get any benefit from the garments resting on him. Similarly, those who sell clothes, carrying their wares on their shoulders, are […]
1,162. Shaatnez Mattresses and Blankets
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176:4 Even if ten mattresses are stacked one on the other, if the lowest one is shaatnez, it is prohibited to lie on the top one. 176:5 If a large garment has a shaatnez at one end of it, one may not cover himself even with the other end. This is the case even if […]
1,161. Shaatnez with Hides or Leather
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176:2 Sheep hides that are made into garments may be sewn with linen thread; we are not concerned about the stray strands of wool even though we are using linen thread. Since the wool hairs are not threads, they are not important and they are nullified. 176:3 According to the Rambam, it is Biblically prohibited […]