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1,196. A Lone Witness; A Paid Witness
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181:13 The testimony of a lone witness is acceptable in monetary cases, since one witness can obligate a litigant to take an oath. A single witness is also acceptable concerning a matter of prohibition. If the prohibited thing has not yet been done, one may testify in order to keep people from sin. However, if […]
1,195. The Obligation to Testify
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181:11 If a city doesn’t have any scholars fit to be judges, they appoint the best and wisest amongst them in the opinion of the townspeople. These will judge even though they aren’t objectively fit to be judges so that the people shouldn’t have to go to non-Jewish courts. Since the residents of the city […]
1,194. Appointing Judges
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181:9 There are times when halacha permits a person to take the law in his own hands. If one sees another person in possession of his property, which the other stole from him, one may take it back from him. If the other opposes him, he may strike him until he releases it if there […]
Concepts in Halacha: Mitzvot
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A frequently performed commandment generally takes precedence over a less frequently performed commandment, but ONLY: Regarding the order in which they are to be performed, and If there is no specific reason to do the less frequent one. If you are only able to do one of several commandments, do the most important one. Example: […]
1,193. Not Lying Even to Reach a Just Outcome
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181:7 It’s forbidden to make a false claim under any circumstances. Even if one knows that he is innocent and that if he speaks truthfully he will be found guilty, nevertheless he may not make a false claim. We see this in the Gemara (Shevuos 31a): The Sages taught: how do we know that if […]
1,192. Unfairly Influencing the Judge
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181:5 One litigant is not permitted to present his case to the judge without the other litigant present. One may not precede the other party by appearing before the judge prematurely so that he won’t be suspected of going to present his case without the other party being present. 181:6 A judge who accepts a […]
1,191. Going to a Secular Court
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181:3 In a society governed by secular law, if the other party in a dispute is being inflexible, one should try to bring him before a Jewish court first. If the other party refuses, one should obtain permission from the beis din to defend his interests in the secular court. 181:4 If one is sued […]
1,190. Compromising Before Going to Court
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181:1 When two people have a disagreement, it’s best if they can compromise. Each one should give something up to the other in order to avoid the embarrassment of having their dispute end up in court. 181:2 If they are unable to reach a compromise and they must go to judgment, they must take their […]