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955. A Shopkeeper
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135:21 If a Jew has wine deposited with a non-Jew, he is exempt from the mitzvah of succah both by day and by night. This is because it is necessary for him to make sure that the non-Jew does not touch the wine (which would render it yayin nesech). If something does not require watching, […]
954. Messengers of a Mitzvah
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135:19 Those who have been sent on a mission to perform some mitzvah, even at night when they are in their hotel, if they are troubled by having to search for a succah, or if it is not comfortable for them to sleep in a succah, or if doing so will affect their ability to […]
953. Traveling on Succos
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135:17 If a person is distressed, he is exempt from the mitzvah of succah at night after the first night(s) of yom tov and on all the days. This applies to one who is distressed because of such things as the cold, the wind, a bad smell, and similar things. It would also apply to […]
952. Women, Children, Sick People
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135:15 Women are exempt from this mitzvah but they are nevertheless permitted to recite the bracha if they choose to eat in a succah. Children are likewise exempt but a father has an obligation to teach every child from the age of five and up to eat in the succah. Even if his father is […]
951. Eating in a Friend’s Succah
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135:13 If a person goes to a friend’s succah and eats there a portion that must be eaten in a succah, he must recite the bracha “leishev basuccah.” This is true even if he visited his friend’s succah in the middle of a meal he was having in his own succah (that is, unless he […]
950. Leaving the Succah
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135:11 When a person is exempt from the mitzvah of succah but he does not leave it, he is considered a common (i.e., unlearned) person. (This refers to when there is an aspect of prohibition involved, such as when sitting in the succah makes him uncomfortable. This is considered a desecration of the holiday’s honor […]
949. Rain and Cold on Succos
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135:9 One is exempt from dwelling in a succah when it rains to the extent that the rain would ruin the food – even if the food is not actually in the succah – or if he estimates that if this much rain had fallen in a room of his house then he would have […]
948. Eating and Sleeping in the Succah
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135:7 On the rest of the nights of Succos, and on all the days, there is no obligation to eat in a succah, but if one wants to eat a fixed meal or to sleep, he must do so in the succah. A fixed meal is more than a k’beitzah of bread (2-3 ounces), even […]
947. Kiddush in the Succah
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135:5 In the evening, after returning from shul, one enters the succah and recites kiddush immediately, but only if it is definitely already night. When he recites the bracha of “leishev basuccah” (that G-d commanded us to dwell in the succah) for kiddush, he should intend for it also to include the meal, sleeping in […]