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238. Not Stopping Activities to Recite Shema
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Kriyas Shema 2:6 If a person is eating, in the bathhouse, getting his hair cut, working with skins, or is involved in a court case when the time to recite Shema arrives, he should finish what he’s doing and recite Shema afterwards. If he is concerned that the time for reciting Shema will pass and […]
237. Stopping Activities to Recite Shema
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Kriyas Shema 2:4 One who is involved with his work must stop while he recites the entire first section of Shema. Craftsmen must likewise interrupt their work for the first section so that their recitation of Shema not be sloppy. The rest of Shema may be recited while working normally. Even if one is working […]
236. Reciting Shema in Any Position
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Kriyas Shema 2:2 One may recite Shema however he is: standing, walking, reclining, or riding on an animal. One may not recite Shema lying face down on the ground or flat on his back facing upward. One may recite it while lying on his side. Someone who cannot roll over onto his side because he […]
235. Reciting Shema Without Intention
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Kriyas Shema 1:13 If a person recited Shema after the third hour of the day, he does not fulfill his obligation to recite Shema in its proper time even if he was delayed by circumstances beyond his control. He does, however, have the merit of Torah study. A person should recite the blessings before and […]
From the Funeral Home to the Cemetery
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Offspring at Funeral Attending a funeral is a mitzva—that of honoring the dead person–but in attending a parent’s funeral, there is the added mitzva of honoring a parent. Adult (at least bar mitzva or bat mitzva) offspring should attend their parent’s funeral, unless there is a financial, health, or other significant reason not to attend. […]