HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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1,265. The Bereaved Close to the End of Shabbos
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196:10 Near nightfall, the onen should recite the Shema without its brachos. He does not daven Maariv or make havdalah. The onen is permitted to eat without hearing havdalah (which is normally prohibited). After the deceased has been buried, he should make havdalah over a cup of wine. Even if the deceased is not buried […]
1,264. Losing a Relative on Shabbos
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196:8 If a person lost a relative and became an onen after the time for morning prayers arrived, if he didn’t yet daven and he will be an onen until after the time to pray has passed, he does not need to offer a compensatory prayer by davening the next Shemoneh Esrei twice. The same […]
1,263. Other Restrictions of an Onen
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196:6 So long as the deceased has not yet been buried, the onen need not remove his shoes and he is permitted to leave his home to tend to needs of the deceased. He is not, however, permitted to sit on a chair or sleep in a bed, and he certainly may not engage in […]
1,262. The Chevra Kadisha
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196:4 If a close relative of the deceased is in a different city but there are other relatives who are required to mourn where the deceased is, then the laws of an onen do not apply to the relative in a different place. However, if there are no other relatives where the deceased is, then […]
1,261. Exemption from Mitzvos
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196:2 An onen is exempt from all mitzvos, even if he doesn’t need to deal with the funeral arrangements, such as if others are taking care of things for him. Even if he wants to be strict on this, he is not permitted to be lenient out of respect for the deceased. The onen may […]
1,260. An Onen
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195:14 In our countries, the practice is not to tear on chol hamoed, except for a parent, whether on the day of the burial or upon hearing of the death – even if the news was delayed. However, if the parent died on yom tov, since the tearing must be pushed off, then he doesn’t […]
1,259. A Sick Person Who Loses a Relative
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195:12 When it comes to a sick person who lost a relative, if his mind is clear but he is unable to tear his garment due to the severity of his illness, he is exempt from tearing when he recovers. The exception is if he becomes able during the shiva, when his grief is still […]
1,258. Mourning for Two Relatives
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195:10 What should a person do if he tore his garment for a relative who died and, while he was sitting shiva for that person, another relative died? In such a case, he moves about three finger-widths from the first tear and tears one handbreadth. Alternately, he may lengthen the first tear by a handbreadth. […]
1,257. Learning of a Passing Later
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195:8 For any other deceased relative, if one only heard he passed away after thirty days, he doesn’t tear his garment. For one’s parent, he always tears the garments he was wearing when he heard, but he doesn’t have to tear any clothes that he may change into later. 195:9 Yom tov cancels the mourning […]
1,256. Sewing the Torn Garment
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195:6 For other deceased relatives, if the mourner changed his garment during the week of shiva, he need not tear the new one. For a parent, however, if the mourner changed his clothes on a weekday during shiva, he must tear them. In honor of Shabbos, he should change his clothes and not wear a […]