HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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1,320. A Married Woman in Mourning
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205:3 If a married woman became a mourner, she is not permitted to eat the first meal from her husband. Since he is obligated to feed her, it’s like her own food. Similarly, if a hired worker whose wages include meals becomes a mourner, he may not eat the first meal of shiva of his […]
1,319. The Meal of Consolation
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205:1 On the first day of shiva, a mourner is forbidden to eat his first meal of his own food, so it’s a mizvah for his neighbors to send him that first meal. This is called seudas havra’ah, the meal of consolation. The meal should start with eggs or lentils because these are round without […]
1,318. Learning of a Death After Maariv
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204:9 If a person learned of a relative’s passing and the congregation has already davened maariv, though it is still daytime, then if he has not yet recited maariv, he is not drawn after the congregation and this day counts for him. If he has already said maariv, however, then the day doesn’t count for […]
1,317. Who is “the Head of the Household?’
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204:7 If he counts with the other mourners, then even if he returns to his home, he keeps their count. 204:8 Who is considered the head of the household for the purpose of these laws? The one whose words will be followed in handling the deceased’s estate. Even if one is young, he can be […]
1,316. A Mourner Who is Out of Town
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204:5 If a person lost a close relative in a different place and he was informed of the passing in the place where he was, he starts counting his mourning period from the time he was informed. Even if he then goes to the deceased’s place and joins the rest of the mourners who started […]
1,315. Relatives Not at the Funeral
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204:3 In a place where the deceased are sent to another city for burial and mourners at home don’t know when he was buried, they start mourning as soon as people return from the funeral, counting both shiva and shloshim from then. (Shiva and shloshim are, respectively, the seven-day and thirty-day periods of mourning in […]
1,314. When Does Aveilus Start?
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204:1 Aveilus (the mourning period) begins immediately when the deceased is buried and the grave is filled with earth. The mourner removes his shoes at the cemetery; if he needs to walk home through non-Jewish neighborhoods (where they will mock him), he may leave them on and put a little dirt in them. 204:2 If […]
1,313. A Pair of Twins
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203:4 If one of a pair of twins died within thirty days, or on the thirtieth day, and the other survived after thirty days, we don’t say that since one survived thirty days that the other was necessarily viable. Rather, one does not observe aveilus in such a case. 203:5 If an adult converted to […]
1,312. Partial Mourning
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203:2 There is a practice to observe partial mourning by oneself for other relatives, the first week until after Shabbos. In such a case, one does not bathe in hot water or change his clothes as he usually does before Shabbos. Not all relatives are the same in this matter. If the deceased was a […]
1,311. For Whom to Mourn
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202:16 Kohanim cannot compel the relatives of a deceased person to hurry up and remove the body from where it is so that they may return to their homes. We only compel the relatives to remove the deceased quickly if a kohein is ill and unable leave his house. This is so the kohein will […]