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Sheva Brachot
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Introduction to Sheva Brachot At the end of the wedding meal, the seven blessings (sheva brachot) are said in birkat ha’mazon. The final blessing is on wine. This is the only required festive meal after the wedding. Any festive meal on the subsequent six days is optional but, when held, all the blessings are required. […]
Wedding Customs
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Wedding Customs (Not Halachot)   Couple Separates for Seven Days The couple does not see each other for seven days before the wedding. They may speak on the phone. The Aufruf On the Shabbat before the wedding, the groom has an aufruf at which he receives an aliya. What the Bride Buys The bride buys for the groom: Talit and kittel, Watch, […]
Weddings
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Minimum Number of Men The minimum number of men at the kidushin part of a wedding is two Jewish males, at least 13 years old (needed as witnesses), plus the groom. Witnesses: Four Pairs A Jewish wedding requires four pairs of witnesses, but the same witnesses may be used for all four parts: tanayim; ketuba; […]
Introduction to Weddings and Marriage; Dating
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Introduction The purpose of the rabbi at a wedding is to ensure that the extremely detailed wedding halachot, as set out by the Shulchan Aruch, are followed correctly. If not, the wedding might not be kosher. A Jewish marriage includes: a written document (ketuba); a financial transaction (ring) in front of two kosher witnesses; and […]
Toveling Utensils
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Tevila is the Hebrew word for immersion.  You must tovel (immerse in a mikva or other halachically purifying water) new utensils made of metal or other materials that require tevila unless you know that they were: Made by a Jew, Sold by a Jew, and Not owned by a non-Jew in between. How To Tovel To tovel a utensil, you may go to any kosher natural mikva (see section […]
Tum’a Removal part 3 – Tevila
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Natural Mikva: Rabbinic Guidance Rabbinic guidance is recommended when using a river, lake, or spring as a mikva due to: Problems of mud, dirt, or sand, and Difficulty in checking if the person is fully underwater, It might not be a kosher mikva. NOTE: This section applies to the immersion of both utensils and people, since the same principles apply. […]
Tum’a Removal part 2 – Handwashing
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HANDWASHING: ONE-TIME METHOD When To Use the One-Time Handwashing Method Use the One-Time Method to wash hands from tum’a: Before… Eating bread. Prayer services. After… Cutting fingernails or toenails. Getting a haircut or shaving. Giving blood. Urinating or defecating. Scratching the hair on your head. Touching leather shoes (not after touching synthetic or cloth shoes). Touching normally covered […]
Tum’a Removal – Part I
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WHAT REMOVES TUM’A Minimum Amount of Water To Remove Tum’a The minimum amount of water to remove tum’a (ritual impurity) is 3.3 fl. oz. (99 ml, or 1 revi’it) total, for both hands. NOTE: By starting with at least one revi’it per hand when washing, we avoid problems of transferring tum’a to other people or utensils. If you start with only one revi’it and […]