Yevamos 7:4-5

Yevamos 7:4

The following can keep the daughter of a kohein from being able to eat terumah but cannot enable the daughter of a Yisroel to eat terumah: an unborn child, a yavam (brother of her deceased husband), a betrothed, a spouse with congenital deafness, and a boy nine years and a day of age. We also rule stringently in a case where it is doubtful whether a boy is nine years plus a day of age, or whether he has grown two pubic hairs. If a man was married to his brother’s daughter and a house falls on them, killing them both, but it is unknown who died first, the brother performs chalitzah and not yibum with a surviving co-wife. (If the wife, his daughter, died first, the surviving brother would be obligated in yibum; if her husband, the survivor’s brother, died first, he would be exempt from yibum.)

Yevamos 7:5

A rapist, a seducer and a mentally incompetent person neither block nor enable the ability to eat terumah. One who is not fit to enter the general marriage pool, such as a mamzer, does impede the ability to eat terumah, as follows: if a Yisroel had sexual relations (out of wedlock) with the daughter of a kohein, she may still eat terumah. If she became pregnant, she may not eat terumah. If the baby is stillborn, she may again eat terumah. If a kohein had such relations with the daughter of a Yisroel, that does not enable her to eat terumah. If she became pregnant, she still can’t eat terumah. If she has a live birth, she may then eat terumah. In this way, the child has greater power than its father. A slave disqualifies one from eating terumah through sexual relations but not through his offspring, as follows: let’s take the case of the daughter of a Yisroel who is married to a kohein or the daughter of a kohein who is married to a Yisroel. In either case, they had a son, who went and had relations with a female slave, who gave birth to a son. That child is a slave. Now, let’s say that this slave’s father and his father’s father both die. In such a case, if the father’s mother is the daughter of a Yisroel married to a kohein, she may not eat terumah (because her non-kohein grandson impedes her). If she is the daughter of a kohein is married to a Yisroel, she may eat terumah (of her father’s house). A mamzer (the product of an incestuous or adulterous relationship) both impedes and enables one to eat terumah as follows: let us again take the case of the daughter of a Yisroel who is married to a kohein or the daughter of a kohein who is married to a Yisroel. In this case, they had a daughter, who married a slave or a non-Jew and had a son; this child is a mamzer. [Please note: the halacha does not follow this opinion. In practice, this child is halachically fit.] In this scenario, the child’s mother and grandfather die. If the mother’s mother is the daughter of a Yisroel married to a kohein, she may eat terumah; if the daughter of a kohein is married to a Yisroel, she may not.
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