Terumos 7:7-8:1

Terumos 7:7

(Continuing the case of two baskets, one of terumah and one of chullin but we don’t know which is which.)

If someone planted the produce in one of these baskets and he didn’t know what it was, he is exempt from repaying the extra fifth. The other basket is treated as terumah but still obligated in challah. This is the opinion of Rabbi Meir but Rabbi Yosi exempts it from challah. If someone planted the contents of the other basket, he is also exempt from repaying the extra fifth. If one person planted the contents of both baskets, if it is a species whose seed disintegrates (like grain), it is permitted to non-kohanim. If it is a species whose seed endures (like onions), it is prohibited to non-kohanim.

Terumos 8:1

If a woman – the daughter of a non-kohein who was married to a kohein – was eating terumah when she was informed that her husband died or divorced her (which ends her right to eat terumah), Rabbi Eliezer says she must repay the value of what she ate plus the extra fifth, like any other non-kohein who ate terumah. The same is true if the indentured servant of a kohein was eating terumah and he was informed that his master died or sold him to a non-kohein. It is also true for a kohein who was eating terumah and was informed that he was the son of a divorcee or a woman who was released through the chalitzah ceremony (which invalidates him as a kohein). In all of these cases, Rabbi Yehoshua exempts them from payment because they acted permissibly. If a kohein was in the middle of offering a sacrifice on the altar when it was discovered that he was the son of a divorcee or a woman who was released through chalitzah, Rabbi Eliezer says the sacrifices he offered are invalid, while Rabbi Yehoshua says they are valid. If it is discovered that the kohein has a disqualifying blemish, his service is invalid.
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