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Torah Methodology #11 – Yatzah lidon badavar hechadash…
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“Kol davar shehayah b’klal v’yatzah lidon badavar hechadash, iy atah yachol l’hachaziro l’klalo ad sheyachazirenu hakasuv l’klalo b’feirush” – Anything included in a general category that is singled out to treat as a new case may not be returned to the general category unless the Torah specifically says so. In other words, once the Torah […]
Torah Methodology #8 – Yatzah min haKlal l’lameid…
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“Kol davar shehayah b’klal v’yatzah min haklal l’lameid, lo l’lameid al atzmo yatzah, elah l’lameid al haklal kulo yatzah” – If part of a general statement is singled out, it wasn’t singled out only to teach something about itself. Rather, it teaches us something about the entire general category. There are 39 categories of labor […]
Torah Methodology #6 – Klal U’Prat U’Klal
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In the past two methodologies, we discussed a general followed by a specific (which limits things to the specific examples) and a specific followed by a general (which includes everything in the general category. Now we come to klal u’prat u’klal, a general case followed by a specific example followed by another general. The rule […]
Torah Methodology #5 – Prat U’Klal
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The rule of prat u’klal is the opposite of klal u’prat. Just as a general category followed by a specific example limits things to the specific case, a specific case followed by a general category is all-inclusive and not limited to the specific example. An example of this is Exodus 22:9, which says, “if a […]
Torah Methodology #4 – Klal U’Prat
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These are terms that we will use for the next eight methodologies, so we’d best explain them. A klal is a generality. A prat is a specification. If I say animals and goats in the same context, “animals” is the klal and “goats” is the prat. Similarly, since carrots are a sub-set of vegetables, “vegetables” […]