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Life

Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

October 7, 2014, by

A traditional food for Simchat Torah, stuffed cabbage provides a hearty and sustaining meal full of nutrients such as vitamin C, cancer-fighting phytochemicals, potassium, and fiber. This dish is a tradition handed down from generation to generation, some saying it is eaten now because the shape resembles a Torah scroll while others argue that the

The Memorial Prayer Service: Yizkor

October 2, 2011, by

Yizkor is the memorial service recited for deceased parents and other relatives at several points throughout the year. The name of the prayer means “May He remember” (“He” being God and “Yizkor” being the first word of the prayer). Not only do many who recite the prayer find it to be a moving, emotional experience,

Simchat Torah: The Secret of Our Eternity

September 30, 2009, by

Jews live in calendar dialectics, oscillating between two Jewish New Years (Tishrei/Nissan) and two Judgment Days (Rosh Hashana/Yom Kippur). Perhaps the greatest Jewish storyteller of all time, the Dubner Maggid, (Rabbi Yaakov Krantz, d. 1804) was once asked: Why do we celebrate both Simchat Torah (the completion of the annual Torah cycle) and Shavuos (commemorating

Simchas Torah: The Secret of Our Eternity

October 1, 2008, by

As Jews, we are accustomed to live in calendar confusion, oscillating between two major Jewish New Years (Tishrei/Nissan), two Judgment Days (Rosh Hashana/Yom Kippur), [two Purims, two Pesachs ..]. It’s not so easy to explain it all. So here’s one more to add to the list. Arguably, the greatest Jewish storyteller of all time, the

A Jumble of Holidays

September 10, 2008, by

There’s an old joke in the Jewish community: The High Holidays are always either early or late; they’re never on time! Well, this year they’re late (Rosh Hashanah begins at sundown on September 29th). But aside from that, this year Shabbat begins one day after Yom Kippur ends (the evening on October 10th). Sukkot, of

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