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Eicha 5:21
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This verse is recited as the ark is closed. It comes from the end of the book of Eicha (Lamentations), which is read on Tisha b’Av. The ibn Ezra explains exactly where we wish to be restored: to Jerusalem, so that we may once again serve G-d as we did before the Temple was destroyed.
Proverbs 3:18
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This verse is recited as the Torah is replaced in the ark. The Metzudas David understands the second part to mean “fortunate are the ones who safeguard the Torah,” i.e., by taking preventive measures in order to stay far from transgression.
Deuteronomy 1:1
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The book of Devarim is also known as “Mishneh Torah,” generally taken to mean “the repetition of the law” (from which the name “Deuteronomy” is derived). While many mitzvos are repeated throughout the book, many are not – and many mitzvos are introduced for the first time in this book! Rabbi Menachem Leibtag of the […]
Jeremiah 2:8
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This verse, describing how G-d was ignored by those who should know better, is pretty straightforward except for identifying some of the players. Specifically, who is meant by the “rulers” and “those who handle the law?” Rashi explains that the kings are the rulers and the Sanhedrin are those who handle the law.
Numbers 10:36
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This verse is recited as the Torah is replaced in the ark. The Talmud in Yevamos (64a) derives from this verse that it takes 22,000 Jews for G-d’s Presence to rest on Israel. “Revavos” (myriads) is 2 x 10,000, and “alfei” (thousands) is 2 x 1,000.
Psalms 24:7
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Psalm 24 is recited in its entirety when returning the Torah to the ark (except on Shabbos mornings). The Talmud (Shabbos 30a) Midrashically relates this verse and the next to a story involving King Solomon. At the inauguration of the Temple, the gates refused to open. Solomon cried out with this verse: open up so […]
Psalms 148:13
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This verse is recited by the shaliach tzibbur when he receives the Torah to return it to the ark. The Sforno explains that G-d is unique because He alone has no end. He is exalted because He remembers all of His creations.
Numbers 36:11
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The order of Tzelophchad’s daughters is given differently here than it is elsewhere. Rashi cites the Talmud (Baba Basra 120a) that they are normally listed according to their wisdom. Here, it lists them by age because it discusses their marriages and they married in order from oldest to youngest.
Jeremiah 1:1
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“Divrei” (“the words of”) denotes a harsh prophecy. The Radak cites a Midrash that three prophets – Jeremiah, Amos and Koheles (i.e., Shlomo) – start their books this way. They each spoke harshly to the people so the negative things in their prophecies started with them. Radak explains that this means that their books describe […]
Numbers 9:23
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The last words of this verse are appended to Deuteronomy 4:44 during hagbah, when the Torah is displayed to the congregation. Rashi on Numbers 9:18 explains the meaning of “at the command of G-d by the hand of Moses.” When it was time for the Jews to travel, G-d’s cloud would rise. It would not […]