No Results Found.

7. In the Absence of Water
by in
2:6 The morning hand washing should be performed using a vessel, water and human effort, i.e., by pouring the water over one’s hands rather than sticking them into running water. This is similar to the way in which we wash our hands before eating bread (a topic we’ll come to in Chapter 40). In a […]
6. The Used Water
by in
2:4 One should only wash one’s hands into a receptacle. One may not use the water with which one has washed one’s hands because of its spiritual uncleanliness. The water must be disposed of in a place where people are not accustomed to walk. (Since we tend to wash in sinks nowadays, our water typically […]
5. Tzitzis and Hand-Washing
by in
2:2 The first garment a man puts on should be his “tallis katan,” AKA tzitzis, as he should not walk four cubits without fulfilling this mitzvah. However, since he has not yet washed his hands, the blessing on the tzitzis may not yet be recited. The Mishnah Brurah (8:1) says to put on the tzitzis […]
4. Washing Hands upon Arising
by in
1:7 There is a collection of prayers known as ma’amados. Those who recite them should conclude the prayers with, “Blessed are You, Who hears prayers” (without the Name of God). If we hear someone conclude with the Name of God, we should strongly inform them that this is incorrect (and therefore an unnecessary utterance of […]
3. Learning Torah by Night
by in
1:5 It is meritorious for a person who is able to arise a little before midnight in order to recite “Tikkun Chatzos.” The basis of this practice is a verse in Eicha (2:19) that refers to the power of crying out during the night. Those who cannot do so at midnight might still recite it […]
2. Being “Strong as a Lion”
by in
1:3 The mishna in Avos adjures us to be “bold as a leopard, light as an eagle, swift as a deer and strong as a lion” to do God’s will (5:23). “Bold” means unafraid of what others may think – if they want to laugh, let ‘em! “Light” means that we should close our eyes […]
Melacha #38 – Makeh B’Patish (Completing)
by in
The boards from which the Mishkan was assembled were covered with a thin layer of gold. These gold sheets were hammered to the boards with perfect symmetry. The final hammer blow was the one that finished the job. The melacha of makeh b’patish literally means the strike of a hammer but it refers to an […]
Melacha #37 – M’chabeh (Extinguishing)
by in
The reciprocal melacha of mavir (igniting) is m’chabeh (extinguishing). As with all “destructive” melachos, such as erasing and demolishing, m’chabeh was done for a constructive purpose in the Mishkan: it was done to make charcoal. (This is the reason for the reference to charcoal in the chapter of Mishnayos called Bameh Madlikin, which is read […]