HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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145. Starting and Ending an Aliyah
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23:21 Similarly, the baal korei should not start an aliyah within fewer than three verses from the start of a section. Therefore, the preceding aliyah, should not be concluded within fewer than three verses from the start of section. 23:22 The baal korei should endeavor to start and end the reading with subjects that have […]
144. The Number of Verses per Aliyah
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23:19 Each aliyah must consist of at least three verses. On Mondays, Thursdays and Shabbos afternoons, we need to read a total of at least ten verses, the third aliyah containing four verses. After the fact, if only nine verses were read, three for each oleh, the obligation has been fulfilled. (Though we should then […]
143. Being Shown the Wrong Place
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23:17 Our practice is to give aliyos to blind people. Even though the Torah may not be recited by heart, the baal korei nowadays does the reading for the oleh, so it is permitted. We also do not check whether a person is learned or unlearned; we simply assume that he can follow the baal […]
142. A Kohein Who Isn’t Fasting
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23:15 On a public fast day, when we read from Exodus chapters 32 and 34, we only call people who are fasting for aliyos. If the only kohein present is not fasting, or if he does not intend to complete the fast, then a Levi or a Yisroel is called for the first aliyah instead. […]
141. Giving Brothers Aliyos
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23:13 We do not call two brothers for successive aliyos. This applies even if they only share the same father or the same mother. The same law applies to a man and his son or grandson. The reason for this is because of ayin hara (the “evil eye,” i.e., a sense of jealousy) we do […]
140. Calling a Someone Who Isn’t There
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23:11 If a kohein or Levi was called for an aliyah and it turns out that he is not in shul, his “understudy” should not be called by name so that people shouldn’t think that there is some defect in the one originally called. Rather, the substitute is simply told to go up without being […]
139. Who to Call Up First
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23:9 If a kohein is present, he is called for the first aliyah. Even if he’s not learned, the kohein has priority over a scholar so long as he’s a “mentch.” (It would be preferable to call a learned kohein before a scholar if possible – Biur Halacha 135:3 s.v. lifnei chacham gadol yisrael.) The […]
138. Talking During Torah Reading
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23:7 If the baal korei is called for an aliyah, another person should stand next to him. The Torah was given to us through an intermediary (Moshe), so our interactions with the Torah should likewise involve the use of an intermediary. (Our practice is for someone to stand on each side of the bimah so […]
137. Standing for Kriyas HaTorah
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23:5 The oleh and baal korei both must stand (as must the gabbai – Mishnah Brurah 141:5). They may not even lean on something because they are supposed to stand in awe. The Torah was given in awe and we must treat it with awe. A person who is weak, however, may lean a little […]
136. Brachos before Reading the Torah
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23:3 Before saying the blessing on reading the Torah, a person opens the Torah scroll in order to see the place from which the Torah will be read. He then holds the scroll open with both hands, closes his eyes, and says “Barchu.” (Some turn their faces away so as not to look as if […]