HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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165. Who Is Considered a Resident
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26:11 A guest within the year of mourning is entitled to one Kaddish among residents who are also in the year of mourning. (If they’re both in the year of mourning, the resident trumps the guest altogether, though the guest has the right to supercede the resident one time – Bi’ur Halacha 132.) 26:12 A […]
164. A Guest in Shloshim
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26:9 A guest in Shloshim and a resident in the year of mourning are considered equal. 26:10 If there’s a resident with yahrzeit and a guest in Shloshim, the resident should say the first and second Kaddishes and the guest should say the third.
163. Residents vs. Guests
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26:7 When there are two mourners with the same level of priority, lots should be drawn. The one who wins says Kaddish at maariv, the one who comes in second gets one Kaddish at shacharis without a lottery, and lots should be drawn for the third Kaddish. If many mourners are present, they should draw […]
162. Yahrtzeit vs. Shloshim
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26:5 A person with yahrzeit and a mourner in Shloshim each have priority over those in the year of mourning, though it is appropriate to enable others to say certain Kaddishes. The Kaddish d’Rabbanan and the Kaddish after Aleinu should be given to the yahrzeit or to the one in Shloshim, while other Kaddishes should […]
161. Shiva vs. Yahrtzeit
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26:3 If there is someone with yahrzeit in shul, then if the mourner is a minor who goes to shul and will potentially be there every day of Shiva, then the yahrtzeit is given one Kaddish. (This is also the case for an adult who davens in shul during the week of Shiva – see […]
160. Kaddish
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26:1 There are numerous Midrashim that describe a son saving a parent from judgment by saying Kaddish in their merit. Other things that can serve as a source of merit for the deceased include maftir and leading the prayer service. This is especially true on Saturday nights, as that is the time that souls return […]
159. Leaving Shul
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25:7 When leaving shul, one should recite the verse: “Hashem n’cheini b’tzidkasecha” (“God, lead me in Your righteousness” – Psalms 5:9). One bows before the aron like a student departing from his teacher. When leaving shul or going down from the bimah, one should be careful not go turn his back to the aron. Rather, […]
158. Aleinu
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25:5 One should try to recite the Kedusha of Uva l’Tziyon with the congregation. If someone arrives in shul while the congregation is saying it, he should say it together with them before he says his own prayers. (Shaar HaTziyon 132:3 says that such is not our practice.) This Kedusha may be recited before the […]
157. U’va l’Tziyon
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25:3 We say the Kedusha in U’va l’Tziyon with its Aramaic paraphrase. We must take care to recite this with proper concentration, though the Aramaic paraphrase should be recited quietly. (When praying alone, it’s okay to say it out loud – Mishnah Brurah 132:4.) 25:4 One may not leave shul before the Kedusha in U’va […]
156. Ashrei and Lamnatzeiach
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25:1 We must pay careful attention when reciting the verses of Ashrei and Psalm 145, especially to the verse “posei’ach es Yadescha,” that God opens His (metaphorical) hand. 25:2 After Ashrei, we recite Lamnatzeiach (Psalm 20) except on Rosh Chodesh, Chanukah, Purim (including Shushan Purim), 14 Adar I and 15 Adar I in a leap […]