HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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34. Eating Before Prayer
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8:1 If one prayed when the day breaks, which is when the first light of the sun can be seen in the East, he has fulfilled his obligation. Therefore, this is considered the start of the time for prayer and a person may not begin any work, conduct his business or start on a journey […]
33. More about the Blessings on Torah Study
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7:7 If one did not say the blessings over Torah study before the morning prayer service (Shacharis), there is a difference of opinion as to whether or not they should then be recited. Some authorities feel that, since the blessing of Ahava Rabbah (or Ahavas Olam) recited before Shema includes the theme of Torah study, […]
32. More about Morning Blessings
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7:5 If a person stayed up all night, he recites all the morning blessings except for the bracha on washing his hands. Since there is a doubt as to whether or not he should recite certain blessings – including “Elokai neshama” (“my God, the soul…”), “hama’avir sheina” (that God removes sleep from our eyes), and […]
31. Morning Blessings
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7:3 The bracha “pokei’ach ivrim,” that God gives sight to the blind, is recited even by a blind person, since he still benefits from the fact that others can see. (For example, he may not be able to drive but others can drive him.) If a person went out of sequence and recited “zokeif k’fufim” […]
30. The Blessings on Torah Study
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7:1 There is a difference of opinion as to whether or not one should respond Amen after hearing the blessing “La’asok b’divrei Torah,” that God commanded us to occupy ourselves with the study of Torah. Some authorities are of the opinion that the bracha does not end there but continues with “v’harev na” (“please make […]
29. Saying Amen – part II
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6:10 One must be careful to pronounce the word “Amen” properly, not hurrying the alef (A) or swallowing the nun (N). WE must also make sure that we do not say Amen before the person saying the blessing finishes his bracha. On the other hand, there must not be too big a gap between the […]
28. Saying Amen – part I
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6:8 When we hear another person saying a bracha we should respond as follows. When he says “Baruch atah Hashem” (“Blessed are You, God”), we should respond “Baruch Hu u’baruch shmo” (“Blessed be He and blessed be His Name”). When the person finishes his blessing, we should say “Amen,” affirming our belief in the veracity […]
27. 100 Blessings
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6:6 All blessings, with one exception, are of Rabbinic origin. Therefore, if a person is in doubt about whether or not he said a blessing, he acts leniently and does not recite the bracha in question. Grace after meals (“bentching”), however, is a Biblical obligation. Therefore, if one is in doubt about whether or not […]
26. God’s Name in Vain
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6:4 A person should be careful not to recite a blessing in vain or even to recite one unnecessarily. If a person makes a mistake and does so – or, if he utters God’s Name in vain in another context – he should immediately say “Baruch sheim kavod malchuso l’olam vo’ed” – ”Blessed be the […]
25. The Name of God
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6:2 When saying a blessing, a person’s mouth should not have food, gum, or even saliva in it. As Psalms 71:8 says, “Let my mouth be filled with Your praise.” God’s praise should fill our mouths, not share the space the foreign objects. 6:3 One may not pronounce the Name of God in vain. The […]