HaShoneh Halachos emails include two halachos per day, seven days a week (emails for Shabbos and Yom Tov are sent in advance). Material is based upon the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch, with occasional elucidation from the Mishnah Brurah abd other sources. The text is not a direct translation but a paraphrase into easy-to-read, conversational English.

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69. Where Not to Place a Mezuzah
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11:18 A place where children may occasionally bathe or urinate should have its mezuzah covered. If a room is regularly used for such functions, like our bathrooms, a mezuzah is not affixed at all. 11:19 A room, or even a courtyard, that is shared with a non-Jew does not require a mezuzah.
68. More Types of Structures
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11:16 A gatehouse is a small building occupied by a watchman. A balcony is a type of outside porch that goes up to a higher floor, like you see in motels. Structures such as these do not require mezuzos, as they are not designed or fit for serving as residences The same is true of […]
67. Structures That Might Not Require a Mezuzah
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11:14 A house that is not built for permanent residence, such as a succah or a stall in a flea market, does not require a mezuzah. A store that permanently houses merchandise, however, does require a mezuzah. 11:15 A porch that has three walls and a ceiling but that is open on the fourth side […]
66. Oddly-Shaped Entrances
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11:12 A doorway that has a curved arch rather than a horizontal lintel – or one that doesn’t have doorposts at all, just an archway – if it is at least ten hand-breadths high and four hand-breadths wide, it requires a mezuzah. (That’s approximately three feet high by 14 inches wide.) What if there are […]
65. What Requires a Mezuzah?
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11:10 The minimum dimensions to obligate a house in a mezuzah is four cubits by four cubits. (An amah, or cubit, is about 18 inches, so this would be about six feet by six feet.) If the square footage is sixteen cubits but it’s not at least four cubits by four cubits (such as a […]
64. Potential Theft of a Mezuzah
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11:8 Some gateways have a small doorway adjacent to the large gate. People regularly pass through this doorway, saving the large gate for infrequent usage. Since there are two discrete entrances, separated by a pillar of at least a hand-breadth in width (around 3.5 inches), each entrance requires its own mezuzah. 11:9 If one has […]
63. Attaching the Mezuzah
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11:6 Here’s how to affix a mezuzah: first, you roll the parchment from the end to the beginning (that is, from the word “Echad” towards “Shema”). The scroll should be placed in a case, which is then nailed to the doorpost at an angle with the top part pointing inwards. If the doorway is too […]
62. Connecting Rooms
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11:4 Let us consider the case of two connecting rooms, each of which opens to the outside, but which also have a door between them. How do we determine which side of the door between these two rooms gets the mezuzah since neither way is any more inherently an entrance than the other? In such […]
61. Placement of the Mezuzah
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11:2 A mezuzah must also be placed on appropriate entrances to courtyards, alleyways, cities and more since the Torah says “and on your gates” (Deuteronomy 6:9, 11:20). 11:3 The mezuzah must be placed on the right side of a doorway, “right side” being based upon the direction a person faces when entering the room. A […]
60. Mezuzah
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10:26 Tefillin are presumed to be fit for use inside and out so long as their boxes are in perfect condition. They need not be opened in order to inspect the parchments but it is appropriate to do so periodically because the possibility exists for them to be ruined by a person’s perspiration. If certain […]