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Rabbi Dr. Asher Meir

Rabbi Dr. Asher Meir

Rabbi Dr. Asher Meir is one of the Jewish world's best-known lecturers and educators in the area of business ethics. Rabbi Dr Meir is known by a wide audience from his Ethics@Work column in the Jerusalem Post, through the popular syndicated column "The Jewish Ethicist," and through his lectures and books. His extensive background includes being educated at Harvard, and obtaining a Ph.D. in economics from MIT. He has worked on the staff of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Regan Administration. His rabbinic ordination is from the Israeli Chief Rabbinate. Rabbi Dr Meir's works combine a professional grasp of the detailed workings of the 21st century economy with a highly-developed sensitivity to the eternal ethical messages of Jewish law and tradition. For a number of years he served as a Senior Lecturer in economics and business ethics at the Jerusalem College of Technology. Rabbi Meir's first book, The Jewish Ethicist, was released in February 2005 and rapidly obtained remarkable reviewer approval. The American Library Association's Booklist applauded it as "an important source of ethical insights for Jews and non-Jews alike," while the Jewish Press noted that the author "combines up-to-the-minute knowledge of his field with thousands of years of Jewish tradition." Rabbi Meir's second book, Meaning in Mitzvot, distributed by Feldheim, provides insights into the deeper spiritual and ethical meanings of the daily practices of Jewish law, has been warmly received by readers. Dr Meir is a regular member of the Ethics Committee of the Prime Minister's office, and of the Israel Economic Association. He has spoken as an invited expert before the Knesset Law Committee. He is a frequent speaker at professional gatherings on business and economic ethics, as well as a lecturer for popular audiences.

Customs of Mourning

July 3, 2014, by

After the tragic death of Nadav and Avihu, Aharon and his remaining sons are commanded to continue officiating as Kohanim, rather than conducting themselves as mourners (Vayikra 10:6). Since they are prohibited from letting their hair grow, we learn that ordinarily mourners are forbidden to cut their hair (Moed Katan 14b, SA YD 390:1). Other […]

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Making a Zimun before the Afikoman

July 3, 2014, by

In general, making a zimun (invitation to grace after meals) is considered a decisive declaration that the meal is over. Therefore, after saying “Let us make a blessing” he is not allowed to eat more of the meal unless he makes a new blessing on the food. (SA OC 179:1.) What happens if someone makes […]

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Estate of a Convert

July 2, 2014, by

A Jew whose Jewish ancestry goes back many generations can never die without heirs. The reason is that when there are no children the chain of inheritance goes upwards to the parents or grandparents, all the way back to the patriarch Yaakov. Even if the parents or grandparents and so on have already passed away, […]

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Doing Business with a Fellow Jew

July 2, 2014, by

Last week we discussed the mandate to strive to do business with a Torah scholar, which the Rambam states is a fulfillment of the Torah commandment to cleave to talmidei chachamim. There is also a mitzva based on a Torah verse to give preference to a Jew over a non-Jew. Let us examine the lessons […]

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Blessing on Fruit Trees

July 2, 2014, by

“One who goes out in the days of Nisan and sees trees blossoming, recites: “Blessed is He who did not omit anything from His world, and created in it good creatures and good trees with which to delight people” (Berakhot 43b, SA OC 226). The “delight” which people receive through these good trees is the […]

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Yibum

July 2, 2014, by

If a man dies without children, the brother is charged with continuing his line: “When brothers dwell together and one of them dies without a child, the widow should not marry out to an unrelated man; her brother-in-law shall go unto her and marry her and fulfill the responsibility of the brother-in-law. And the first-born […]

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Shining the Groom’s Shoes

July 2, 2014, by

It is a mitzva to gladden the bride and groom; one way this is customarily done is by dancing before them and attending to their needs. Most of us are accustomed to see guests bring glasses of water to the bride and groom or to fan them to cool them off; another kind of service […]

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Muktze

July 2, 2014, by

When HaShem tells Moshe how His manna will feed the Jewish people, He says, “And on the sixth day they will prepare what they brought, and it will turn out to be twice as much as they gather every day.” (Shemot 16:5.) Of course the people must prepare the manna every day; still, this preparation […]

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Asking Forgiveness from our Fellow Man

July 2, 2014, by

Repentance: For sin against fellow man Yom Kippur alone can not atone for sins against other people. Only when the victim is appeased can the offender seek forgiveness from HaShem – and this too is needed, for any crime against a fellow human being is also a crime against God (SA OC 606:1). Forgiveness: Each […]

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Praying in a Minyan

July 2, 2014, by

The mishna at the very end of Rosh HaShana records a dispute between Rabban Gamliel and the Sages. The Sages state that the prayer leader (shaliach tzibur) can fulfill the prayer obligation only of those who are unfamiliar with the prayers. Those who are familiar with the prayers and are able to pray are obligated […]

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